Sunday, November 7, 2021

Duganski - Garlic

 Duganski Garlic


Garlic -hardneck - purple stripe - Duganski

 Origin and History

This variety comes from Uzbekistan or Kazakhstan, regardless of the exact country, it seems certain that this variety comes from central Asia, the area that is reported to be the first place garlic was cultivated. Our seed stock was acquired from Great Lakes family farm near the Grand Bend, Lake Huron,  Ontario. 

Description : Full sun, Mid-season, purple stripe type, long storing, Pungent and really tall garlic

Allium sativum ssp ophioscorodon ‘Duganski’

Light Requirement: Full Sun

Growing Zone: 3-7

Harvest: Mid Summer

Plant Spacing:  10-15 cm or 4-6"

Plant Depth: 5-8 cm or 2-3"

Plant Height: 45-60 cm or 18-24"

This is a beautiful garlic with an amazing flavour, and comes in large bulb sizes. The cloves of this garlic are violet-tinged and with a purple outer wrapper. The flavour of this garlic can be described as being fiery, but will mellow out with a pleasant aftertaste. 

Duganski is a hardneck garlic variety, produces large bulbs, strong pungent flavor, and with cloves that are purple. This variety is a robust cultivar, grows taller than most varieties, has wider leaves, larger scapes and matures mid-season.

Plant the garlic bulb before the ground freezes. Pick a well-drained, rich, organic garden bed to plant into. Plant the pointed end of the clove up, 5-8 cm (2-3″) deep and 10-15 cm (4-6″) apart. Lightly cover with soil and water thoroughly. Cover with a layer of mulch such as leaves or straw to provide insulation from fluctuating temperatures in winter and spring. Remove the mulch in early Spring or keep it for weed control. 

 When the garlic breaks through the soil the following Spring it is recommended to add an all purpose fertilizer.

In late Spring snip the scapes from the head of the garlic plant to channel the energy to the bulb formation. Scapes are a delicious early season garlic treat.

The Garlic is ready to harvest when the leaves of the plant are 3/4 yellow and start to die back. Lift the soil around the garlic bulb before trying to remove the garlic from the soil. Pull the garlic from the soil and place the garlic in non-direct sunlight with good airflow to allow the garlic to dry for 7-10 days.

 After the garlic has cured you can trim the small roots on the bottom of the garlic and remove one layer of skin. Store in a dark cool area.








Saturday, November 6, 2021

Pumpkins, Straws and Leaves

PUMPKINS, STRAWS AND LEAVES


 The pumpkin this year is a welcome suprise. Among the pile of clay fill - it grows well. Last year 2020, our 120 plants yeilded nothing, save for some winter squash. 


This year 2021, we made some progress and we got 20 pumpkins at least. 


We also accept pumpkin donations to feed the farm wildlife. As a city farm, we have deer, turkeys, foxes,  birds, and small animals that need sustenance.  

We also compost them after to enrich our soil. 

We accept yardbags of leaves, straw and pumpkins to help the composting system and give back to the land. 

We thank all community members who help us feed the land and farm sustainably. 


Sunday, July 18, 2021

Tiny Garlic and Fun at the farm


18 July 2021

 It has been brought to my attention that we have the tiniest garlic. 


Do you want to buy it? 5$ each, because its rare. We are the only one who have it. 

Msg me at sweetwilliamfarms@gmail.com so we can reserve your garlic. Lets see what recipe you can come up with a tiny garlic.

And take lots of pictures. I must go back to the field and pull more tiny garlic.

Much love, Angelina

Friday, July 16, 2021

Season 2021 with Gratitude

 July 16, 2021, Friday

Ottawa City, Ontario, Canada




Let  us start with a BIG THANK YOU for all those who believe in us. 

High school students come to help plant the Foodbank Gardens. 

Community business and contractor friends brought some clean fill. 

Community Farm Section B was opened. We have 8 more families coming to garden and plant fresh produce for their families

 Our Childrens Garden is set up accross the Food Bank Garden - lots of potatoes for the kids. 

Our friend Carmen donated the Currant bushes, which is thriving.

Sundaura donated sour cherries for us, the Romeo and Juliet Series I believe. 

Our peach tree survived too, 2 of the 3 that Greta brought us, which was from Sundauras stock. 

Our 1$-2$ is still on if you need peppers, tomato, kale, basil, marigold, oregano. 

There is never enough time during the day - said every farmer, but hey, they wild pollinator gardens thrive. 

A better planet, a better way of growing food by enriching our soil and cleaning our water and air ecosystem. Noble goals, tough process. 

We love it all, the sweat, the dirt, the rashes and itch over tall weeds - it has been a journey!

















Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Safe Seed Pledge

 

Safe Seed Pledge

We support the Safe Seed Initiative, and have signed the Safe Seed Pledge:

    "Agriculture and seeds provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners, and consumers who want an alternative, we pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants. The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing are necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems, and ultimately healthy people and communities."

Tuesday, January 12, 2021

SeedList2021

 January 12, 2021

As farmers, we grow and many varieties of vegetables. We test, we gather data, we collaborate and share our seeds with fellow gardeners in Ottawa. 

Our farmer license allows us to get access to wholesale seeds, and oftentimes, we have more than enough for our acreage. As a result, we gladly share our seeds with our community in Ottawa. We believe in the power of community, sharing, and growing food together. 

We also believe in collaborative work to practice regenerative farming practices. We believe in Landcare practices that enrich the soil for future generations. We look at a holistic approach to the mineral and water cycle on the farm. We re-use cardboard as weed suppression layers, we collect pumpkin and vegetable peels to feed earthworms, deers, wildlife, and eventually continue to enrich organic matter to feed our plants. We plant cover crops to keep the farm green and prevent soil erosion. We gather leaves and branches to create compost and use in our garden plots to conserve moisture. We have community farmers, learning from each other to promote food production, production technique, cooking knowledge, and saving seeds. 

By buying our seeds, you are helping us further our mission to regenerate an old homestead farm, to raise money for our non-profit endeavors such as growing food for our local food bank, women's shelter, and children's garden. We also promote employment opportunities for teens, students, women, GLBTQ community members. We offer workshops, farm walks, and mini-workshops (when allowed). 

Please support our local Seed Producers here in Ottawa: Gretas Organics, Bird and Bee Seed Company. They are our mentors and friends, and they supply us with unique heirloom seeds that we continue to grow. 


FAQ: What happens when you are not happy with your seed purchase?

 We will make it right, we can give you more seeds, we can give you a different variety to try, and we can invite you to our workshops. Our goal is to create a collaborative community to grow, cook, save seeds, and share. 

You have extra seedlings? You have way too many?

 No problem, come and see us and plant it in the Foodbank garden. Come harvest time, enjoy and harvest for your family and share the rest. 

The time to start a revolution is now - let us plant a seed!

All seed packets are 5$ each - taxes included. 

PICK UP:  pre-arranged curbside pick-up: 52 Antares Drive, Ottawa Ontario at Unit 3 (9am-4pm)

Contact us: sweetwilliamfarms@gmail.com

Request for Delivery by our friendly local Ottawa Delivery - Gopher It - Courier Services


List of seeds: 

  1. Sunflower - black oil seed, black mammoth
  2. Summer Squash - Deema Hybrid
  3. Radish - Daikon
  4. Beans - Provider
  5. Borage
  6. Spinach - Escalade
  7. Turnips
  8. Beets
  9. Swiss chard - bright lights
  10. Winter Squash - butternut
  11. Peas- Cascadia
  12. Beets
  13. Garlic - Duganski ( cloves ) 

Contact us: sweetwilliamfarms@gmail.com

















Sunday, December 27, 2020

Burdock (Arctium tomentosum)

December 27, 2020 Saturday

Burdock (Arctium tomentosum)

In the beginning,(May 1, 2020) , this land is full of burdock. All the burs (old flowers) were tall, the stick to Kyles shirt, and he is 6 ft 4 in height. I find the plant amazing because they manage to thrive here all these years. As we can recall, the last farmers in this land were here in the 1950s and record never showed any farm operated here. Whoever has rented the old yellow house, they live here and just enjoyed the fallow fields.

 Burdock grows abundantly and never harvested. The area where the "foodbank garden" and "childrens garden" is full of them. I am excited for so many food source.  The leaves are huge, these leaves remind me of Rhubarb. Even Kyle mentioned it that it looks like Rhubarb, he found these plants abundantly growing near the fallen willow tree.  I went and scouted the area, and notice that it was clumps of burdock. I know the long taproot will be huge, and I saved it for later use. 

I started saving the seeds as well, its not difficult to save them because the burr with stick to your shirts, or your shoes to annoy you. So in winter, I walk the fields and save the seeds. 

In Japan, burdock has traditionally been an important source for food and medicine. Called “poor-man's potatoes,” it’s eaten as a vegetable called gobō. It was brought to Japan from China 1,000 or so years ago as a medicinal plant, but it didn’t become popular in the Japanese diet until the Edo period. Japanese breeders worked to domesticate burdock, and it is now considered a delicacy. 


Sow in early spring or late fall, soaking the seeds before sowing. Plant ¼ inch deep, 12 inches apart, or grow in tall wooden boxes that allow the long root to develop. 


It produces a large rosette of leaves and a large edible taproot in the first year. Burdock flowers the second year; it may become invasive.


Note: Dec 25, 2020, Friday around 6 degrees C . It was a green christmas, I visited the farm and went to a walk with Kieren and Karlina. It was actually warm and it was nice. 


Duganski - Garlic

 Duganski Garlic Garlic -hardneck - purple stripe - Duganski   Origin and History This variety comes from Uzbekistan or Kazakhstan, regardle...